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Garden Diary for July 2014

It’s Berry time! My favorite time to go through the garden and just pick and taste and compare all the different varieties of soft fruits we grow within the walled garden. Black currants, white currants, red currants, gooseberries, raspberries, blackberries…it seems to be a good year for berries and most of them except the blackberries are ready to be pick.

Pic1 White Currant’ White Versaille’
Pic1 White Currant’ White Versaille’

Also the 2 varieties of figs we have, ‘Brunswick’ and ‘Ischia’ are carrying heavy but it will take roughly another 6 weeks of sunny and warm weather for them to be fully ripe.

Pic2 Fig ‘Brunswick’
Pic2 Fig ‘Brunswick’

When you plan to set up your own vegetable or fruit garden make sure you also consider the time you need to harvest your products. It is often underestimated how long it takes to pick especially small soft fruits like gooseberries or currants and also to prepare them later on. We use white and red currants in the decoration of our homemade cheese cakes for example.

Pic3 Homemade cheesecake
Pic3 Homemade cheesecake

Nearly all of the  apple trees have a nice crop this year which is good to see for two reasons. First of all it looks like the bees are still out there plentiful and doing there job and secondly the very hard pruning they underwent last winter did not do them any harm.

Pic4-Cooking-Dessert-apple-‘Golden-Spire’-1024x741
Pic4 Cooking & Dessert apple ‘Golden Spire’

The first spuds are harvested and the heritage variety ‘Sharps Express’,  from  1901, gave a good yield. We have started to plant pumpkins on the empty ridges and afterwards to cover the ground.

Pic5 First Early Potato ‘Sharps Express’
Pic5 First Early Potato ‘Sharps Express’

A weekly supply of fresh lettuce to the restaurant, like the butterhead ‘Webbs Wonderful’, is also on our agenda at the moment. Before we bring over the heads we must rinse them off carefully.

Pic6 Lettuce for the restaurant
Pic6 Lettuce for the restaurant

Despite the good weather we had in the last few weeks we would not dare to plant our tomatoes, cucumbers and aubergines outside. To have any success with them they need to stay inside the vinery; the Irish climate is not suitable to grow them in the open.

Pic7 Tomatoes and co. in the vinery
Pic7 Tomatoes and co. in the vinery

The flower garden is in full bloom by now. Strong colour combinations like the orange of the Calendula ‘Orange King’ and the intense deep blue of Lobelia ‘Chrystal Palace’ work well together and are seen from far away which is important for the garden with our scale.

Pic8 Summer bedding in the formal flower garden
Pic8 Summer bedding in the formal flower garden
Pic9 The Parterre in July
Pic9 The Parterre in July

One of the summer highlight in our garden is always the Herbaceous Border. Especially between June and August it is a constant flowering show of herbaceous plants of all kinds. Every week more plants are opening up their flower heads and others finish flowering, so no week is the same.

Pic10-The-Herbaceous-Border-beginning-July-1024x682
Pic10 The Herbaceous Border beginning July

Below are few pictures of my favorite plants which are flowering in the border at the moment.

Pic11 Rosa ‘Blue Magenta’
Pic11 Rosa ‘Blue Magenta’
Pic12 Verbascum chaixii ‘Album’
Pic12 Verbascum chaixii ‘Album’
Pic13 Lilium pardalinum
Pic13 Lilium pardalinum
Pic14 Centaurea macrocephala
Pic14 Centaurea macrocephala

I hope this summer spell will last; everything is just more enjoyable when the sun is out, even the weeding!

Pic15 Panorama view
Pic15 Panorama view

Last but not least, a quick hello from our new arrivals within the walled garden; four Robin chicks are happily waiting in their well hidden nest for the next feed.

Pic16 Robin chicks
Pic16 Robin chicks

Your Head Gardener
Anja Gohlke

Things you can do in your garden in July:

To Sow / Propagate:
~ Pot on the last of this years summer bedding as backup plants
~ Start to sow spring bedding like Wallflowers and Bellis for next year’s spring  display at the end of the month
~ Sow spring cabbages for over wintering
~ Take cuttings of non flowering shoots of Fuchsia, Pelargonium and Hydrangea

To plant:
~ Plant out more catch crops like lettuce and spring onion
~ Plant squash, pumpkins, marrows and courgettes & feed regularly
~ Finish planting out winter brassicas

To harvest:
~ Soft fruits like Raspberries
~ Mangetouts, Peas, Broad beans
~ Potatoes
~ Lettuce, Spinach, Leaf beet
~ Herbs for drying or for fresh herbal teas like Sage or Mint

To maintain & prune & feed:
~ Regularly dead heading of bedding like Calendula and herbaceous plants for continues flower display
~ Check vegetables and flowers for pest and diseases e.g. cabbage root fly, caterpillars, green flies
~ Prune shrubs after flowering
~ Feed lawns and Buxus hedges

Garden Diary for June 2014

The summer is landed…well, at least the calendar is trying to tell us this. We spent the first of June in our glasshouse, well protected from the heavy rainfall. We always leave the indoor work, if possible, for wet days to come. So, one of the jobs would be the spreading and tidying of the spring bulbs which we took out of the beds recently. Once dried and cleaned they will be counted and safely stored away.

Pic1 Spring bulbs
Pic1 Spring bulbs

The tomatoes, cucumbers and melons are still not big enough to go to their final position in the vinery. We keep potting them on until big enough to give  them a good head start.

 Pic2 Young tomato plants
Pic2 Young tomato plants

Our annual marathon-planting session of the flower and vegetable garden is nearly finished; it is always a big relief if we manage, once again, to put all plants into the beds in time; before they get a set back from sitting in trays too long. We had a small worry that our Calendula plants got a virus but a good feed of Seaweed dust seemed to have cleared it up and strengthened the plants. The picture below shows one of our students in full action; even though ‘incognito’! The midges were so overwhelming on this particular day that we had to cover up every part of the body, even the face!

Pic3 Preparing beds for summer planting
Pic3 Preparing beds for summer planting

The Runner and French beans are still small and especially the French dwarf and climbing beans need a lot of sun and warm weather to perform well in our garden. Last year was exceptionally good for them, will we be lucky again???

Pic4 Our bean plot
Pic4 Our bean plot

Our potatoes seem to have a good season so far, the first earliest are very strong and it looks like we will have a nice crop. We used to have a problem with wire worms so we did not plant any potatoes in this particular plot for several years to clear it up. It seems to  have worked!

Pic5 Early Spuds
Pic5 Early Spuds

Its this time of year were the comfrey is in full bloom and gives a great show along the south garden wall. We received so many questions about the use of this plant that we finally put up a small information panel.

Pic6 Comfrey plot
Pic6 Comfrey plot

The Herbaceous Border is changing into summer display; yellow, rose and shades of lilac and purple are the dominant colours at the moment.

Pic7 Herbaceous Border beginning June
Pic7 Herbaceous Border beginning June
Pic8 Lilium ‘Yellow Turks
Pic8 Lilium ‘Yellow Turks
Pic9 Hosta sieboldiana
Pic9 Hosta sieboldiana
Pic10 Oriental Poppy – Papaver orientale ‘Beauty of Livermere’
Pic10 Oriental Poppy – Papaver orientale ‘Beauty of Livermere’

The candelabra primulas in the fernery are still flowering and they really brighten up this shady area along the stream. Another very useful plant to use in shady areas is Astelia, in our case Astelia nervosa. The long linear and light green leaves look very architectual, the plant is evergreen and the flowers have an interesting appearance.

Pic11 In the fernery
Pic11 In the fernery
Pic12 Astelia
Pic12 Astelia

Sadly our garden cat Lara, with us for over 16! years and well known for her friendliness to tourists, is gone from us. We believe she went into he woods to find a quite spot to go into ‘cats heaven’. We will miss her!

Pic13 Our Lara
Pic13 Our Lara

Below few more pictures of the garden and its surroundings!

Pic14 Clematis ‘Nelly Moser’
Pic14 Clematis ‘Nelly Moser’
Pic15 Flower of Phormium
Pic15 Flower of Phormium
Pic16 Azalea in front of Head Gardener House
Pic16 Azalea in front of Head Gardener House
Pic17  The willow dome at the Teahouse
Pic17 The willow dome at the Teahouse

Your Head Gardener 
Anja Gohlke

 

Things you can do in your garden in June:

To Sow / Propagate:
~ Thin out carrots and parsnips, protect against carrot fly
~ Take softwood cuttings of shrubs
~ Continue sowing and planting lettuce for succession planting

To plant:
~ Plant out pumpkins, marrows and French / Runner beans
~ Plant more radishes
To maintain & prune & feed:
~ Watering of new crops and bedding is essential in dry periods
~ Feed annual bedding plants and baskets
~ Start to deadhead herbaceous plants regularly
~ Summer feed lawns
~ Look out for caterpillars, green or black flyes and other creatures

Garden Diary for May 2014

Welcome back to our May edition of the garden blog of the walled garden of Kylemore Abbey.
The last of our tulips, especially the lovely red variety ’Cardinal Red’, were more or less “beheaded” during the last stormy weekend. In perfect conditions they could have lasted another two weeks at least. Thankfully I took pictures before the blossom show was finished.

Pic1 Spring display with Tulip ‘Cardinal Red’
Pic1 Spring display with Tulip ‘Cardinal Red’
Pic2 Tulip wallichiana
Pic2 Tulip wallichiana

So we decided to start to plant out our summer bedding which is well advanced this year. Seed germination was particularly good this spring. The wet and cold conditions we are experiencing at the moment are a bit of a hinderance. We try to plant when it is dry enough which means we have to juggle around with our routine work a bit.

Pic3 Bed ready for planting
Pic3 Bed ready for planting

The blown off blossom of the crab apple trees looks like snow from last winter on the meadow. I hope the bees managed to get around on time… A nice crop of apples, plums and pears would be nice this year. Last year was not very successful, only our soft fruits did well. It must be a good year for cherries, though. We never saw such an abundance of Cherry blossom, especially on the Morello cherries (sour variety). It also would be the first season ever to actually get a plentiful crop of cherries on the espaliers. I nearly gave up on them, always thinking the rather shady and damp spot is not suitable for them. It will be interesting to see the outcome; they may still have to be transplanted.

Pic4 Blossom of our Crab apples
Pic4 Blossom of our Crab apples
Pic5 Still very green cherries
Pic5 Still very green cherries

I always liked the look of the newly emerging leave buds of shrubs, perennials or ferns. It feels like that the last dreadful winter never happened (I mean the horrible weather conditions of course!). The different shapes and fresh colours are so unique to every plant, nothing looks the same.

Pic6 New leaves of Hosta sieboldiana
Pic6 New leaves of Hosta sieboldiana
Pic7 Young leaves of Bottlebrush buckeye (Aesculus parviflora)
Pic7 Young leaves of Bottlebrush buckeye (Aesculus parviflora)
Pic8 A fern is enrolling its new leaves
Pic8 A fern is enrolling its new leaves

The Vegetable garden is nearly planted up, few more Cabbages, Parsley and later on the Carrots and Parsnips need to be planted.
The Marrows, Courgettes and Pumpkins have time until June, the later the better to ensure dry and warm weather (wishful thinking!).
The leafy shoots of the potatoes are getting mounded around at the moment. This process will be repeated every couple of weeks. This process is also called ‘Earthing up’ and will increase the length of the underground stems which will eventually bear the potatoes.

Pic9 Ulick is ‘earthing up’
Pic9 Ulick is ‘earthing up’

Our Herbaceous Border is starting to develop its summer layout. Plants are filling out the empty spaces and the first ones are in bloom; mainly pink to blue flowering herbaceous like Iris, Geranium and Persicaria.

Pic10 Herbaceous Border beginning May
Pic10 Herbaceous Border beginning May

The Fernery is always a kind of secret place within the walled garden . Nestled along the stream between the formal flower garden and the 2 acre vegetable garden it is a place to rest, reflect and even hide, like in Victorian times when ‘Hide & Seek’ was one of the favourite pastime activities among the adults! A lovely late spring flowering bulb is Leucojum aestivum, the Summer Snowflake. It is very easy to grow, in all kind of conditions.

Pic11 Summer Snowflake
Pic11 Summer Snowflake
Pic12 A place to rest – the Fernery
Pic12 A place to rest – the Fernery

Once again we started to sell freshly picked herbs for herbal teas in our Tea house; situated just outside the Walled garden and facing the impressive Diamond hill.

Pic 13 Fresh Mint for sale
Pic 13 Fresh Mint for sale

I hope the weather improves soon so we can enjoy the beauty of the garden world.

Your Head Gardener
Anja Gohlke

Things you can do in your garden in May:

To Sow / Propagate:
~ Harden off later vegetable seedlings like pumkins, marrows and beetroot
~ Sow French and Runner beans
~ Sow Carrots and Parsnips
~ Take softwood and non-flowering cuttings of Fuchsia and Pelargonium
~ Continue sowing lettuce for succession planting (every 10 days)
~ Take softwood cuttings of shrubs

To plant:
~ Start to plant out summer bedding in final position and protect against slugs
~ Transfer leeks outside into final position
~ Plant Tagetes and Calendula as companion plants between your crops to attract beneficial insects

To maintain & prune & feed:
~ Trim formal hedges of Buxus, Fuchsia or Escallonia and feed them
~ Dead head flowers of spring bulbs like Tulips for strong flower displays next year
~ Watering of new crops and bedding is essential in dry periods
~ Put up supports on taller perennials, broad beans and sweet peas
~ Prune spring flowering shrubs like Weigelia or Forsythia after finishing flowering
~ Keep records of successful/unsuccessful spring planting areas for next years spring season
~ Aerate and sand lawns if not done earlier

Garden Diary for April 2014

April’s fool’s day is over and April weather started! Gorgeous yesterday, the warmest day so far; horrible today! Well, no reason to mourn, there is plenty of work to be done inside the glasshouse at the moment.
Our potting benches are nearly overflowing with trays and we need a very strict time table to get through the whole lot. Once potted on and left few days inside the glasshouse the more hardy plants will be moved out under the coldframes.

Pic1 ‘Potting time’
Pic1 ‘Potting time’
Pic2 Coldframes
Pic2 Coldframes

Our willow nursery got a hard cutting back last week. The fresh willow will be used to repair our willow structure outside the teahouse and for supports for the next generation of sweet peas. Dried willow will be later on used in our Herbaceous Border to support taller varieties of perennials.

Pic3 Harvested & graded willow
Pic3 Harvested & graded willow

Our vegetable garden is getting planted up bit by bit. The dark soil in the freshly rotovated plots looks very fertile and clean and it is hard to imagine that only in a couple of weeks most plots will be covered with all kind of crops.

Pic4 Newly planted potato plot
Pic4 Newly planted potato plot
Pic5 Broad beans waiting to be planted
Pic5 Broad beans waiting to be planted

We also prepared new ridges and planted out our heritage varieties of strawberries. The variety ‘Royal Sovereign’ (Fragasia x ananassa) dating from 1892, was bred by Thomas Laxton, who can be considered the ‘father’ of the modern strawberry. We also planted a couple of the wild or wood strawberries (Fragaria vesca), which has much smaller fruits. The wild strawberry was the predecessor of the modern strawberry and was bred the first time in Brittany in France around 1750.

Pic6 Newly planted Strawberry ridges
Pic6 Newly planted Strawberry ridges

Finally the main bulk of our spring flowers emerged and started to flower nicely throughout the flower garden.
Fritillaria imperalis ’Aurora’, the orange flowering Crown Imperial and ‘Maxima Lutea’, the yellow variety are just starting to open up their huge flower heads. We actually had to move the orange one inside the vinery for shelter. They were planted in terracotta pots and were not stable enough to be left out during strong winds. We also staked all the flower stems for support.

Pic7 Crown Imperial ‘Aurora’
Pic7 Crown Imperial ‘Aurora’
Pic8 Crown Imperial ‘Maxima Lutea’
Pic8 Crown Imperial ‘Maxima Lutea’

Also the yellow flowering Hyacinth ‘City of Haarlem, dating back to 1893, Fritillaria meleagris (Snake heads fritillaria) and Narcissus ‘Butter & Eggs’ add to the flowering display at the moment.

Pic9 Hyacinth ‘City of Haarlem’
Pic9 Hyacinth ‘City of Haarlem’
Pic10 Narcissus ‘Butter & Eggs’
Pic10 Narcissus ‘Butter & Eggs’
Pic11 Snake heads fritillaria
Pic11 Snake heads fritillaria

The frosty nights are over (so I hope!) and we started to move out tender plants like palms. The sheltered space inside the vinery is needed for pelargoniums and fuchsias.

Pic12 Tender plants enjoy fresh air
Pic12 Tender plants enjoy fresh air

The herbaceous border is also getting a makeover. Tidied, top dressed with our own well-rotted compost and fed with chicken manure…the new growing season can start!

Pic13 Herbaceous border is getting manured
Pic13 Herbaceous border is getting manured

There a plenty of spring flowers on the grounds of Kylemore leading to the Walled Garden, too. Just in front of our crafty shop is a nice window box with a selection of colourful bedding plants. This is easy enough to achieve and everybody can create a spring feeling at home by planting up all types of boxes, buckets or pots with a variety of spring bulbs and plants.

Pic14 Spring display at the Kylemore Craft Shop
Pic14 Spring display at the Kylemore Craft Shop

Your Head Gardener
Anja Gohlke

Things you can do in your garden in April:

To Sow / Propagate:

~ Continue potting on and harden off bedding plants
~ Continue sowing later summer beddings
~ Sow Tomatoes and Cucumber in modules
~ Continue sowing lettuce for succession planting
~ Sow carrots in situ later in the month

To plant:
~ Plant out sweet peas and put up climbing supports
~ Plant out peas, mangetouts and spring onion
~ Plant main crop potatoes
~ Plant herbaceous plants

To maintain & prune & feed:
~ Clean and prepare Hanging Baskets for May planting
~ Continue lawn care like aerating and sanding, feeding and weeding
~ Sow new lawns or top dress and resow damaged patches
~ Start to trim formal box and fuchsia hedges

Garden Diary for March 2014

March is in full swing and so are our garden activities. Greenhouse work is top priority at the moment, which means sowing, potting, watering, watching for diseases and little unwanted creatures.

Pic1 A busy place
Pic1 A busy place

Speaking about creatures, we just successfully eliminated a small colony of mice. They got a taste for our spring bulbs which are now sitting half eaten in nice terracotta pots. Our two garden cats are getting old and are not up to big mice hunting anymore.

Anyway, the mice did not get all bulbs and our first Hyacinths are just opening up their pale pink flower heads. The variety ‘Ann Mary’ has this old fashioned delicate look and goes well with shades of dark blue for example.

Pic2 Hyacinth ‘Ann Mary’
Pic2 Hyacinth ‘Ann Mary’
Pic3 Blue Hyacinth
Pic3 Blue Hyacinth

The stunning Crocus vernus ‘King of Striped’, an old garden favourite, is in full bloom and bands of  amethyst-violet colour are running from north to south in the flower garden. This type of Crocus is not demanding and flowers every year without failure.

Pic4 Bands of Crocus vernus ‘King of Striped’
Pic4 Bands of Crocus vernus ‘King of Striped’
Pic5 Vibrant colours of Crocus
Pic5 Vibrant colours of Crocus

If the weather plays along we have to do a lot of tidying at the moment. Every bed is getting a cleaning job done; old leaves, broken branches and other debris is getting removed. Our first students just started their placement here with us and the extra help is welcomed at the moment.

Pic6 Maintaining a flower bed
Pic6 Maintaining a flower bed

One of our three Rhubarb plots is dug up and reduced in size. New timber edging will keep the outline tidy and makes it easier to maintain. The dug up Rhubarb is left on a plastic sheet for the moment and will be divided and replanted when the ridges are prepared.

Pic7 New Rhubarb plot
Pic7 New Rhubarb plot
Pic8 Waiting to be replanted
Pic8 Waiting to be replanted

It is also this time of year where you can harvest willow if you have a plantation. Ours is about 6 years old and supplies us every year with a good crop of strong willow. The willow is used for plant supports later on or for play structures like a willow tent which needs to be repaired after the winter storms.

Pic9 Willow plantation
Pic9 Willow plantation

It is not too late to plant bare-rooted shrubs or trees. Nurseries are still supplying these as long as the temperatures stay low enough. A newly planted hedge of Portuguese laurel, a nice evergreen shrub with reddish branches, will green up the area around the Head Gardeners House.

Pic10 New Portuguese laurel hedge
Pic10 New Portuguese laurel hedge

We just finished our National Tree Planting Week today. Three local schools came to us and planted tree saplings like Oak and Sycamore. It was a joy to have these enthusiastic kids planting trees and we had to stop a few arguments about who will have the next go on the spade!

Pic11 “Hands on!”
Pic11 “Hands on!”

Enjoy the first signs of spring!

 

Your Head Gardener

Anja Gohlke

 

Things you can do in your garden in March:

 

To Sow / Propagate:

~ Sow first potatoes around St. Patricks Day, Seaweed is a good fertilizer

~ Harden off first vegetables like Broad beans, Lettuce or Kale in cold frames

~ Pot on seedlings into potting compost  when big enough

~ First sowing of green manure into prepard plots  like Phacelia or Mustard

~ Take cuttings Pelargonium, Fuchsia

 

To plant:

~ Last chance to plant bare- rooted shrubs, roses and trees

~ Plant advanced Broad beans and stake them well

~ Plant or transplant perennials in borders

~ Divide & replant chives (also great in borders and good for black flies on roses)

 

To maintain & prune & feed:

~ Prune Hydrangea, not too severe to ensure they will flower this year

~ Last chance to prune Gooseberries

~ Feed all fruit trees and bushes with potash

~ Feed flower borders with chicken pellets

~ Feed Spring Cabbages with Seaweed powder

~ Cut back Willow for later use

Garden Diary for February 2014

A very warm welcome to all readers of our monthly garden blog from the Victorian Walled Garden in Kylemore Abbey. Let’s hope we will have a good year ahead, with plenty of sunshine of course!

First things first – the weather! It is bad! Saying this we are still doing quite ok out here in the Wild West. Minor floods, washed away paths and unfortunately a few fallen trees. But it could be worse if you look at places like Cork with immense floods.

Such weather makes gardening a bit more challenging these days and at the moment there is no end to these weather conditions in sight.

A good few flower beds are under water and it will be a surprise to see how many spring bedding will flower. We kept few backup plants in cold frames as replacements.

Pic1 A fallen Giant – Elm tree
Pic1 A fallen Giant – Elm tree

The first Snowdrops are flowering in our fernery, which I am very glad to see. We lost many in the recent years, either they rotted in the wet ground or were eaten by little creatures. The varieties we grow are Galanthus nivalis, Galanthus nivalis ‘Flore Plena’, Galanthus elwesii and  Galathus plicatus.

Pic2 Snowdrops (Galanthus) in our fernery
Pic2 Snowdrops (Galanthus) in our fernery

The snowdrops are accompanied by yellow flowering winter aconites (Eranthis hyemalis), which were planted last autumn. Both are one of the first spring bulbs to flower and use the light and sunshine coming through the leafless tress. A dull looking woodland can be brightened up nicely with early flowering ground cover plants like these two. Later on they will be replaced by wood anemones and bluebells.

Pic3 Winter Aconite
Pic3 Winter Aconite

The first Crocus and  Helleborus are also flowering for the last couple of weeks. So there is a bit going on in the ‘Flowering World’ already.

Pic4 Crosus chrysanthus ‘Fuscotinctus’
Pic4 Crosus chrysanthus ‘Fuscotinctus’
Pic5 Helleborus angustifolius
Pic5 Helleborus angustifolius

Winter season in a garden means a lot of digging work. This year we tackled our rose bed. To aerate and de-compact the whole bed we dug it over with a fork and mixed in a fair amount of our own well-rotted Farm Yard Manure. This will give the roses the needed boost. I also ordered new roses to go into this bed; a few older ones need to be replaced. Heirloom varieties of Tea, Hybrid Perpetual, Moss and China roses should flower nicely later on in the season. Digging in our garden also means treasure hunting! It is very seldom that we don’t come across a few pieces from the past such as bottles, clay pipes, glass from the original glasshouses or even animal bones, which were used as a fertilizer during Victorian times.

Pic6 Newly prepared rose bed
Pic6 Newly prepared rose bed
Pic7 ‘Artefacts’ found during digging
Pic7 ‘Artefacts’ found during digging

Our spring cabbages are standing strong despite the severe weather conditions and the first rhubarb stalks are peeping through the layer of manure. One of the older Rhubarb plots will be dug up and replaced with new crowns divided from a different plot.

Pic8 Spring cabbages
Pic8 Spring cabbages
Pic9 The first Rhubarb
Pic9 The first Rhubarb

We received the first flower and vegetable seeds for our coming propagation  season  and it is a very time consuming job to sort and file them in our record cards and put them alphabetically  into boxes until sowing time. We have sown the first batch of Lettuce ‘Winter Density’and ‘Paris Island Cos’ and Spring onion ‘White Lisbon’ into modules in our propagation glasshouse. Next week we will start to propagate our Heritage varieties of Sweetpeas.

The last image is showing the bridge over to the Herbaceous Border and the Vegetable Garden on a nice sunny day; something very rare during these days!

Pic10 A bit of sunshine
Pic10 A bit of sunshine

Below are few tips for gardening in February as usual.

 

Slan and happy digging from

Your Head Gardener

Anja Gohlke

 

Things you can do in your garden in February

To Sow / Propagate:

~ Start to sow summer bedding and vegetables seeds indoor

~ Start Dahlia tubers in pots

~ Move seed potatoes into light for chitting

 To plant:

~ Continue to lift, divide and replant herbaceous plants

~ Transfer and plant Snowdrops after flowering

~ Continue to plant trees, shrubs and roses

 To harvest:

~ Last of Parsnips, Leeks, Swedes and Beetroots

To maintain & prune & feed:

~ Prune woody plants like Buddleja hard back

~ Fertilize roses with well-rotted Farm Yard Manure

~ Maintain, sharpen and repair tools etc., clean pots and trays

~ Prepare ridges in vegetable garden for first crops

~ Lawns could get first cut if ground is suitable and not too wet